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Sri Lanka Equity Forum » Stock Market Talk » How interest rates affect stock market

How interest rates affect stock market

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1How interest rates affect stock market Empty How interest rates affect stock market on Mon Dec 17, 2012 3:57 pm

sriranga

sriranga
Co-Admin
During the past week, the Central Bank of Sri Lanka lowered its policy rate. This resulted in the Colombo Stock Exchange showing significant gains. On December 12, 2012, the policy rates were lowered and this resulted in the All Share Price Index (ASPI) increasing by 98.9 points (1.8%) from 5,417.7 points to 5,516.6 points. This is a significant growth experienced in a single day. How did this occur?
Interest rates- most people pay attention to them and they can impact the stock market. But why? In this article, you will learn some of the indirect links between interest rates and the stock market and how they might affect your life.

Interest rate
Essentially, interest is nothing more than the cost someone pays for the use of someone else’s money. Homeowners know this scenario quite intimately. They have to use a bank’s money, through a mortgage, to purchase a home and they have to pay the bank for the privilege. Credit card users also know this scenario quite well - they borrow money for the short term in order to buy something right away. But, when it comes to the stock market and the impact of interest rates, the term usually refers to something other than the above examples - although we will see that they are affected as well.

The interest rate that applies to investors is the policy rates set by the Central Bank of Sri Lanka. This is the cost that banks are charged for borrowing money from the Central Bank of Sri Lanka.

Why is this number so important? It is the way the Central Bank attempts to control inflation. Inflation is caused by too much money chasing too few goods (or too much demand for too little supply), which causes prices to increase. By influencing the amount of money available for purchasing goods, the Central Bank can control inflation. Other countries’ central banks do the same thing for the same reason.

Basically, by increasing the policy rates, the Central Bank attempts to lower the supply of money by making it more expensive to obtain Effects of increase

When the Central Bank increases the interest rates, it does not have an immediate impact on the stock market. Instead, the increased interest rates have a single direct effect - it becomes more expensive for banks to borrow money from the Central Bank. Increases in the interest rates also cause a ripple effect, however and factors that influence both individuals and businesses are affected.

The first indirect effect of an increased policy rate is that banks increase the rates that they charge their customers to borrow money. Individuals are affected through increases to credit card and mortgage interest rates, especially if they carry a variable interest rate. This has the effect of decreasing the amount of money consumers can spend. After all, people still have to pay the bills and when those bills become more expensive, households are left with less disposable income. This means that people will spend less discretionary money, which will affect businesses’ top and bottom lines (that is, revenues and profits).

Therefore, businesses are also indirectly affected by an increase in the policy rate as a result of the actions of individual consumers. But businesses are affected in a more direct way as well. They too borrow money from banks to run and expand their operations. When the banks make borrowing more expensive, companies might not borrow as much and will pay higher rates of interest on their loans. Less business spending can slow down the growth of a company, resulting in decreases in profit.

Stock price effects
Clearly, changes in the policy rate affect the behaviour of consumers and businesses, but the stock market is also affected. Remember that one method of valuing a company is to take the sum of all the expected future cash flows from that company discounted back to the present. To arrive at a stock’s price, take the sum of the future discounted cash flow and divide it by the number of shares available. This price fluctuates as a result of the different expectations that people have about the company at different times. Because of those differences, they are willing to buy or sell shares at different prices.
If a company is seen as cutting back on its growth spending or is making less profit - either through higher debt expenses or less revenue from consumers – then, the estimated amount of future cash flows will drop. All else being equal, this will lower the price of the company’s stock. If enough companies experience declines in their stock prices, the whole market, or the indexes (like the ASPI and Milanka) that many people equate with the market, will go down.

Performance of Colombo Stock Exchange and Treasury Bill Rate Investment effects
For many investors, a declining market or stock price is not a desirable outcome. Investors wish to see their invested money increase in value. Such gains come from stock price appreciation, the payment of dividends - or both. With a lowered expectation in the growth and future cash flows of the company, investors will not get as much growth from stock price appreciation, making stock ownership less desirable.

Furthermore, investing in stocks can be viewed as too risky compared to other investments. When the Central Bank raises the policy rate, newly offered government securities, such Treasury bills and bonds, are often viewed as the safest investments and will usually experience a corresponding increase in interest rates. In other words, the ‘risk-free’ rate of return goes up, making these investments more desirable. When people invest in stocks, they need to be compensated for taking on the additional risk involved in such an investment, or a premium above the risk-free rate. The desired return for investing in stocks is the sum of the risk-free rate and the risk premium.

Of course, different people have different risk premiums, depending on their own tolerances for risk and the companies they are buying into. In general, however, as the risk-free rate goes up, the total return required for investing in stocks also increases. Therefore, if the required risk premium decreases, while the potential return remains the same or becomes lower, investors might feel that stocks have become too risky and will put their money elsewhere.

Bottom line
The interest rate, commonly bandied about by the media, has a wide and varied impact upon the economy. When it is raised, the general effect is a lessening of the amount of money in circulation, which works to keep inflation low. It also makes borrowing money more expensive, which affects how consumers and businesses spend their money; this increases expenses for companies, lowering earnings somewhat for those with debt to pay. Finally, it tends to make the stock market a slightly less attractive place to investment.

Keep in mind, however, that these factors and results are all interrelated. Described above are very broad interactions, which can play out in innumerable ways. Interest rates are not the only determinant of stock prices and there are many considerations that go into stock prices and the general trend of the market - an increased interest rate is only one of them. One can never say with confidence, therefore, that an interest rate hike by the Central Bank will have an overall negative effect on stock prices.

(Source: Investopedia)
http://www.dailymirror.lk/business/features/24305-how-interest-rates-affect-stock-market-.html

http://sharemarket-srilanka.blogspot.co.uk/

2How interest rates affect stock market Empty Re: How interest rates affect stock market on Mon Dec 17, 2012 5:19 pm

Universalgoal


Assistant Vice President - Equity Analytics
Assistant Vice President - Equity Analytics
wonder full article
thank you

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